What is the / true opposite of human?

By Jennifer Huang
Essays    Reportage    Marginalia    Interviews    Poetry    Fiction    Videos    Everything   
Interviews

“Our identities are made up of many, often conflicting parts, but are of us, nonetheless.”

Interviews

Luis H. Francia and Eric Gamalinda talk about the making of AAWW’s Filipino American literary anthology

Interviews

The poet talks with Eileen Tabios about his writing process and how “language can be a thicket and brambles”

Interviews

Making art during a pandemic also clarifies your work, in the way that uncertainty strips away the unnecessary so you can focus on the essential.

Interviews

The author of the graphic novel The Waiting on family separation and the Korean War

Interviews

“I think if we can hear from each other that being a model minority is not the only way to have value, and that being the good child is not the only way to be a good person, what might that unlock?”

Interviews

“What people say about the patriarchy hurting men is true. Men benefit from it, but it also hurts them.”

Interviews

“I wanted to turn to actual living language—and reveal, through poetry, the contradictions or erasures or sometimes comic possibilities imposed by different texts.”

Interviews

While I was doing witness work around violence, I was also always living in a shadow space where I could be safer, where I could be protected, where I was known, where I could not be misread

Interviews

Jessica Hagedorn, Kimiko Hahn, and Kyle Dacuyan talk about the funky, raw arts spaces we need

Interviews

A former Open City Fellow answers 10 questions about her writing life

Interviews

“It’s not really about trauma—it’s about what it means to resurrect out of that.”

Interviews

“Show up and that’s enough, and you can leave all this neurosis behind.”

Interviews

“One day, very soon, this silence is going to be so deadly and people will not be able to carry its weight anymore.”

Interviews

Looking back at 9/11 and the Fall 2011 issue of the Asian American Literary Review

Interviews

“I feel like my writing is always either at a micro-cellular level or a drone level. There’s this constant cycle between being way too close and things feeling surreal, or pulled way out and things also feeling a little surreal.”

Interviews

“What debts—monetary, emotional, filial—did my parents have that I’ve inherited?”

Interviews

The stories in this folio piece together alternate, speculative histories that reflect distinctly queer modes of life: often without a clear resolution, a “moral,” or a sense of “straight” logic

Interviews

“It feels like you have crossed a river you cannot cross back again”

Interviews

“Our identities are made up of many, often conflicting parts, but are of us, nonetheless.”

Interviews

Jessica Hagedorn, Kimiko Hahn, and Kyle Dacuyan talk about the funky, raw arts spaces we need

Interviews

Luis H. Francia and Eric Gamalinda talk about the making of AAWW’s Filipino American literary anthology

Interviews

A former Open City Fellow answers 10 questions about her writing life

Interviews

The poet talks with Eileen Tabios about his writing process and how “language can be a thicket and brambles”

Interviews

“It’s not really about trauma—it’s about what it means to resurrect out of that.”

Interviews

Making art during a pandemic also clarifies your work, in the way that uncertainty strips away the unnecessary so you can focus on the essential.

Interviews

“Show up and that’s enough, and you can leave all this neurosis behind.”

Interviews

The author of the graphic novel The Waiting on family separation and the Korean War

Interviews

“One day, very soon, this silence is going to be so deadly and people will not be able to carry its weight anymore.”

Interviews

Looking back at 9/11 and the Fall 2011 issue of the Asian American Literary Review

Interviews

“I think if we can hear from each other that being a model minority is not the only way to have value, and that being the good child is not the only way to be a good person, what might that unlock?”

Interviews

“I feel like my writing is always either at a micro-cellular level or a drone level. There’s this constant cycle between being way too close and things feeling surreal, or pulled way out and things also feeling a little surreal.”

Interviews

“What people say about the patriarchy hurting men is true. Men benefit from it, but it also hurts them.”

Interviews

“What debts—monetary, emotional, filial—did my parents have that I’ve inherited?”

Interviews

“I wanted to turn to actual living language—and reveal, through poetry, the contradictions or erasures or sometimes comic possibilities imposed by different texts.”

Interviews

The stories in this folio piece together alternate, speculative histories that reflect distinctly queer modes of life: often without a clear resolution, a “moral,” or a sense of “straight” logic

Interviews

While I was doing witness work around violence, I was also always living in a shadow space where I could be safer, where I could be protected, where I was known, where I could not be misread

Interviews

“It feels like you have crossed a river you cannot cross back again”